Home Field

OUR NAME

Because many (although not all) ethnographers of North America are also from there in one sense or another, we also think about the politics and ethics of North American anthropological engagement through the idea of doing ethnography ‘at home.’ However, in our name and elsewhere, we emphatically do not suggest that

1. Anthropology’s proper home is any version of US American intellectual genealogy, geographic space, or neo-imperialist reach; or

2. That only people ‘from’ North America can or should do ethnography here.

Indeed, not only do we welcome and encourage North American ethnographic engagement from diversely-situated scholars, but we also recognize and seek to foreground disciplinary contributions from the margins; from the global south; from Indigenous sovereign nations; from locations of US empire; and from historically excluded scholars. We imagine Home/Field as, in part, a space where we think about our obligations of care and experiment with accountability towards the people we learn with and from, as well as the broader spaces and places we call home.

AIM & MISSION

Home/Field is a space for ethnographers of North America to contend with pressing issues through an anthropological lens, and to explore what anthropology as a discipline — methodology, theory, ethics, and more — can contribute to the imagination and enactment of a more just world. Home/Field is a project of the Society for the Anthropology of North America. We aim to publish short-form, dialogical, and multi-sensory work that exists in parallel to the long-form scholarly work found in the Journal for the Anthropology of North America to complement the research articles found in the journal.

meet the editorial team

molinari​

Sarah
Molinari

Worcester Polytechnic Institute

disaster recovery; debt politics;
grassroots movements; care; Puerto Rico

image17080945720

Deniz
Daser

University of St. Gallen

undocumented migration; labor and work; post-disaster rebuilding; insurgent citizenships; US Gulf region

raschig

Megan
Raschig

CSU Sacramento

World-building; Chicanx-Indigenous Healing; Anti-Carceralism; Feminist and Fugitive Ethnography
flood

David
Flood

University of virginia

Race and Whiteness; Capitalism; Activism;
Music and Sound; Rural US

lanari

Elisa
Lanari

Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity

race/ism; whiteness; insurgent suburbs;
Latinxs; metropolitan US
attridge

Jeff
Attridge

Clark Art Institute

critical and collaborative museology; material culture; critical phenomenology; temporality

caverly

Nick
Caverly

UMass Amherst

racism + coloniality; infrastructure; struggles for justice; cities in north america
chrisler

Matthew
Chrisler

CUNY Graduate Center

publics; racial and colonial formations;
social reproduction; crisis; US Sunbelt
formanack

Allison
Formanack

University of Southern Mississippi

whiteness/critical race studies; housing; materiality; experimental and collaborative ethnography

hernandez-reguant

Ariana
Hernandez-Reguant

Tulane University

urban; political (ideology & local governance); placemaking ; media; art ; collaborative ethnography ; documentary film
howard

Rachel
Howard

University of Chicago

Southwest US; race; politics; water; reproduction; homeownership; crisis

luther

Erin
Luther

IWK Health

more-than-human; political ecology; affective capital; urban space; care ethics

mack

Abby
Mack

Weber State University

public mental health care; incarceration; abolition and transformative justice; clinical and faith-based recovery; Los Angeles and Appalachia

moore

Sheehan
Moore

CUNY Graduate Center

political ecology; land; property; crisis; environmental governance; US/Gulf south
rosenbaum

Susanna
Rosenbaum

City College of New York

immigration, gender, race, care work/reproduction, labor

randle

Sayd
Randle

Texas A&M

environment; climate change; water; infrastructure; urban political ecology; multispecies

anderson

Don
Anderson

Palo Verde College

urban space; labor; technology;
communications; ritual and performance

about jana + sana

JANA

JANA is the peer-reviewed publication of the Society for the Anthropology of North America. We welcome manuscripts concerned with the anthropology of the United States, Canada, and Mexico. While elements of this research tradition are addressed by applied, medical, educational, political, and urban anthropology, among others, JANA focuses upon this region as an “area” by placing research findings in historical perspective and theoretical conversation. JANA is particularly committed to featuring work from diversely situated scholars that builds on critiques of inequality and violence to further envision, imagine, investigate, and enact actual alternatives to the ‘-isms’ of our time. We aim to publish manuscripts that anchor theory-building in compelling ethnographic grounding, and we are particularly insistent that our authors avoid the temptation of simply processing a case study through a given theoretical lens. Going further, we want to invite (and challenge) authors to bring out the reflexive and ethical dimension of their work: the what is to be done?

JANA publishes two issues per year, in the spring and fall. Members of the Society for the Anthropology of North America receive JANA as a benefit of their membership. Please visit www.sananet.org to learn about becoming a member.

SANA

Home/Field is a project of the Society for the Anthropology of North America (SANA). The goal of SANA is to address the need for a focused voice and insti­tutional pre­sence for the anthro­po­logy of the Uni­ted States, Can­ada, and Mex­ico. SANA works to foster scholarship and promote dialogue across scholars of North America.

We urge you to consider joining SANA as a member. Membership supports Home/Field, as well as travel awards for students and emerging scholars, book prizes, and other events and programs that support anthropological engagement with North America.

Want to be a part of Home/Field?

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