Home/Field

An online space for anthropological engagements with North America
Author Engagements

On “Asian America” and Multiracial Solidarity: A Conversation between Jong Bum Kwon and Elizabeth Hanna Rubio

How are transgressive multiracial coalitions built and sustained? What are the affective and epistemological limits of individually-oriented “how-to” anti-racism work? With an ethnographic focus on Black-Asian solidarity work, what impasses in collective identity emerge to beg the question, what is Asian America? Home/Field brought Jong Bum Kwon and Elizabeth Hanna Rubio into conversation to discuss these and more themes, based on Rubio’s recent publication in Journal for the Anthropology of North America.

Dialogues

Anthropologists Call on the Biden Administration to Cease the Separation of Im/migrant Families and the Detention of Children

We urge the Biden administration to cease separating im/migrant families through the misuse of public health policy Title 42 and to ease the myriad restrictions constraining individuals’ right to seek asylum, including the detention of children in all forms. In this statement and call to action, we draw on our expertise as anthropologists to historicize family separation and to argue for immediate action to defend the human rights of im/migrants and refugees.

A/V Essays

Stories on the Edge of the Sea

Visual Essay by Ryan Anderson

“And yet, like that single human figure, and the others throughout these images, we humans swim, play, contemplate, push back, and adapt. We persist. Despite the enormity and immensity and inevitability of it all.”

Author Engagements

I’m Afraid of that Water: A Collaborative Ethnography of a West Virginia Water Crisis

JANA Book Review Co-Editor Jasper Waugh-Quasebarth zoomed in for a conversation with the co-editors and contributors of I’m Afraid of that Water: A Collaborative Ethnography of a West Virginia Water Crisis (West Virginia University Press 2020) to talk about the practice of collaborative ethnography and working as a collaborative team in face of this disaster.

Dialogues

Reimagining Native North America at the Field Museum: An Interview with Alaka Wali

Interview by Ana Croegaert

“In the past few decades some museums of ‘natural history’ have revisited their collections and reexamined their curatorial practices in efforts to shift away from grand narratives grounded in museums’ roles in imperial formations to foster spaces wherein artifacts can be engaged as dynamic and agentive, and as having the capacity to generate dialogue, disagreement, and affect among museumgoers.”

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